University of Pretrial Library

Questioning the Practice of Pretrial Detention: Some Empirical Evidence from Philidelphia - Goldkamp 1983 

09-16-2019 12:53

In response to the lawsuit Jackson v. Hendrick over jail conditions, the Court of Common Please set forth conditions to address substandard conditions, including what came to be known as the Jackson Rule - "prompt review for release of all defendants held on $1,500 bail (only $150 bail in actual ten percent terms) or less, with particular priority assigned to those confined for the longest periods awaiting trial." Goldkamp's 1983 study took advantage of this 'natural experiment' condition by looking at (1) how people who were released under the Jackson rule and (2) how those people who were released would have been assessed under a classification instrument. Goldkamp found that people released under the Jackson rule were 3.5 times more like to fail to appear and 2.3 times more likely to be arrested than the average person detained in Philadelphia. As for the classification instrument, Goldkamp found that the instrument did a good job predicting new arrests among people released under the Jackson rule, but underpredicted failures to appear.

#PretrialAssessment #Philadelphia​​ ​​

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